DRI-161 for week of 11-30-14: The Enemy Within: The Move to Strangle Welfare-State Reform In Its Crib

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The Enemy Within: The Move to Strangle Welfare-State Reform In Its Crib

The resurgence of the Republican Party after the overwhelming victory of Barack Obama and the Democrats in the 2008 elections was led by the Tea Party. This grassroots political movement began as a popular uprising and only gradually acquired formal organizational trappings. As yet, its ideological roots are so thin and shallow that they provide no support for the movement.

This contrasts sharply with the conservative movement, in which the order of development was reversed. Ideology came first, with roots implanted firmly by opposition to the New Deal and a foreign policy led by Sen. Robert Taft. The intellectual foundation laid by William F. Buckley, Jr. in National Review Magazine educated a generation of young Republicans and paved the way for the candidacy of Barry Goldwater in 1964. Goldwater’s landslide defeat nevertheless introduced Ronald Reagan to national politics. By the time Reagan became President in 1980, conservatism had become the dominant political paradigm.

Nowhere is a vacuum more abhorrent than in political ideology. Today’s victorious Republicans may purport to search for a mode of governance, but what they are really doing is belatedly deciding what they stand for. (The hapless domestic and foreign policies of the Obama administration gave them the luxury of winning the elections merely by signaling their lack of congruence with President Obama et al.) They enjoy a surfeit of advice from all quarters.

Nowhere is this advice more pointed than in its economic dimension.

 

Should Republicans “Take ‘Yes’ For an Answer?”

 

Although Buckley died in 2006, National Review still retains some of the intellectual momentum he generated. Its “Roving Correspondent,” Kevin Williamson, devoted a recent essay to an advisory for the Republican Party on post-victory strategy. Williamson sees the solid victory in the 2014 mid-term elections as “a chance to meet voters where they are.” To do that, Republicans need to “take ‘yes’ for an answer.”

Exactly how should we interpret these glib formulations? Williamson insists that Republicans should not treat electoral good fortune as the opportunity to create change. Instead, the Party should reverse the normal order of precedence and cater to popular disposition – “meet the voters where they are” instead of persuading the voters of the desirability or necessity of change. Don’t continue the campaign, Williamson pleads. The votes have already been counted; just “take ‘yes’ for an answer” and get on with the business of crafting a governing compromise that everybody can live with.

So much for the revolutionary stance of the Tea Party; the EPA won’t have to test BostonHarbor for caffeine contamination.

The reader’s instinctive reaction to Williamson’s essay is to flip the magazine over and re-check the cover. Can this really be National Review, legendary incubator of conservative thought, renowned for taking no prisoners in the ideological wars? We have just suffered six years under the lash of a Democrat regime whose marching order was “elections have consequences.” Now the flagship of American conservatism is preaching a gospel of preemptive surrender?

Williamson’s mood is apparently the product of disillusionment. The birth of NR, he reminds his readers, was a reaction to Eisenhower Republicanism. Instead of rolling back the welfare state installed by Roosevelt and Truman, Ike accepted it – thereby setting the tone for Republican policy thereafter. The magazine fulminated, but to no avail. Goldwaterism produced Reagan… “a self-described New Deal Democrat,” pouts Williamson, “who famously proclaimed that he hadn’t left eh Democratic Party but the party had left him.”

Reagan revisionism is part of a new NR realpolitik, it seems. “At the end of the Reagan years, the Soviet Union was dead on its feet, the United States was a resurgent force in the world… and spending and deficits both were up, thanks to the White House’s inability or unwillingness to put a leash on Tip O’Neill and congressional Democrats. The public sector was larger and more arrogant, there were more rather than fewer bureaucrats and bureaucracies, and nobody had made so much as a head fake in the direction of reforming such New Deal legacies as Social Security or even Great Society boondoggles such as Medicaid.”

The author’s psychological defeatism apparently so overwhelmed him that he lost touch with reality. The Soviet Union is “dead on its feet” but the singular responsibility of President Ronald Reagan for this fact is unmentioned. (One cannot help wondering whether this is an oversight or a deliberate omission.) But Reagan is held liable for the actions of the Democrat Speaker of the House and Congressional Democrats! Has anybody blamed Barack Obama for not “putting a leash on House Republicans” to achieve more of his agenda? Has Williamson published his Canine Theory of Congressional Fiscal Restraint in a peer-reviewed journal of political science?

One might have thought that winning the Cold War, taming hyperinflation and reviving moribund economic growth (also left unmentioned by Williamson) constituted sufficient labor unto a Presidential tenure. Various authors, ranging from Paul Craig Roberts to David Stockman, have chronicled the internecine warfare attending the Reagan administration’s efforts to cut the federal budget. Apparently Williamson has forgotten, if he ever knew, that Reagan enjoyed the reputation of a ferocious budget-cutter while in office. This dovetailed with his famous declaration that “government isn’t the solution – it’s the problem.” If, three decades after the fact, Reagan’s efforts seem puny, this may be because we hold him responsible for failing to effect a counterrevolution to match the permanency of FDR’s New Deal. One would think, though, that the only President since FDR to actually reduce the size of the Federal Register deserved better at Williamson’s hands.

Obviously, Williamson paints a false portrait of the Reagan years to justify the counsel of despair he gives today. “We did not undo the New Deal in the 1980s. We are not going to undo the New Deal before 2017 either… the fact remains that the American people are not as conservative as conservatives would like them to be, nor are they always conservative in the way conservatives would like them to be.” It seems that there is a “disconnect between the numbers of Americans who describe themselves as ‘conservative’ or ‘liberal’ and the policy preferences those Americans express.” Americans think of themselves as conservative but favor liberal policies. So, Williamson concludes, the only sensible thing to do is humor them.

“Americans …are, by and large, conservative in the same sense that Ronald Reagan was, not in the sense that Robert Taft was, or… Barry Goldwater was. They intuit that the federal government is overly large and intrusive, they resent the slackers and idlers who exploit that situation, and they worry that our long-term finances are upside down, but they do not wish to repeal the New Deal.”

“Example: A majority of voters believe that something must be done to rectify Social Security’s finances, and a plurality of voters believe that a combination of benefit cuts and tax increases should be adopted to achieve that… [but] strong majorities … of 56 percent… oppose Social Security benefit cuts and Social Security tax increases, according to Gallup. No doubt many of these voters think of themselves as conservatives… it is likely that the great majority of self-described conservatives would support continuing current Social Security policies indefinitely – if they believed it fiscally possible. The current Left-Right divide on Social Security is not a question of what we ought to do, but of what we can do.” Williamson cites Robert Taft’s eventual concession on Social Security as an example of the Right bending its principles to his form of pragmatism. After all, “populist measures are, to the surprise of nobody except scholars of political science, popular, hence the support among a majority of registered Republicans for raising the minimum wage.”

Instead of fighting among themselves on principle, Williamson contends, Republicans should be scanning the polls to find out where their base stands – and adjusting their stance accordingly. They should be meeting the voters where the voters are rather than persuading voters to see the light of sweet reason. They should take “yes” for an answer when they hear it from the networks on election night.

Rebutting Williamson’s “Populism”

 

No full-blooded Tea Party member will swallow Kevin Williamson’s argument, despite the author’s insistence that he is really enunciating their position. They didn’t overcome the twin obstacles of the Democrat Party and the Republican establishment only to be lectured on their extremism in the pages of National Review, for crying out loud. But we must go beyond visceral rejection of Williamson’s moral and psychological defeatism. Straightforward analysis indicts it.

Since the venue is National Review, it is fitting to recall Bill Buckley’s distinction between politics and economics: “The politician says: ‘What do you want? The economist says: What do you want the most?'” For many decades, voters have been offered big government as if it were a consumer product with zero price. That is the context in which to contemplate the poll responses that Williamson treats as commandments graven in stone. In the beginning, there was the word. And conservatives believed the word. But when the world around them changed and God neither smote the unbeliever nor struck down the evil Antichrist, conservatives eventually shrugged and went with the flow. After a while they began singing the same hymns to Baal as the liberals. They couldn’t very well go to jail for non-participation in the Social Security system and they discovered that the government checks always cashed – so why not go along? It was the only way they could get their money out.

In due course, conservatives found out along with the rest of society that they had been lied to and flimflammed by the pay-as-you-go status of Social Security. It was not a system of insurance, after all; the word “social” in the terms “social insurance” and “Social Security” should be taken to mean “not,” just as it does in terms like “social justice,” “social democracy” and “social responsibility.” By then, though, everybody was so thoroughly habituated to the system that it would have required something close to a revolution to change it. Something like what the colonists originally did when they revolted against the British and dumped tea in Boston harbor, for example.

When Williamson implies that conservatives are entirely comfortable with Social Security today, he is being disingenuous. (That either means “lacking in candor” or “naïve;” he is either lying to us or he is plain stupid.) In fact, conservatives (and just about everybody else) below the age of 50 no longer expect even to receive Social Security benefits – they expect the system to go bankrupt long before they collect. They are not comfortable with the system but resigned to it; there is a world of difference between the two. And considering that Williamson himself just published an article on “Generation Vexed” and its growing dissatisfaction with the Obama regime in the previous issue of NR, he cannot claim indifference to their electoral attitudes in this context.

But this attitude of resignation is wildly optimistic compared to the fiscal reality facing America and the rest of Western industrial society today. The welfare state is collapsing around our ears. Central bankers are in extremis; they are reduced to printing money to finance operations. The Eurozone staggers from crisis to crisis. Japan is now working on its third “lost decade.” Demography is a disaster; birth rates will not bail us out. Worse – they are falling like leaden raindrops, reducing the number of workers paying in per welfare-benefit recipient. The crisis is not in the far-off future but today – if the U.S. had to finance upcoming deficits at normal rates of interest rather than the “zero interest rates” of the last five years, the interest charges alone would eat up most of the federal budget. And the entitlement programs that Williamson views as sacred are now eating up most of that budget.

Williamson acts as if Social Security finance were a Starbucks menu. He treats longstanding conservative doctrine on Social Security as if it were excerpted from fundamentalist Scripture out of Inherit the Wind. But he is no Clarence Drummond; Social Security is exactly the Ponzi scheme that conservatives have always fulminated against. In fact, it is worse, because the Day of Judgment is arriving even sooner than prophesied.

True, it isn’t just Social Security – it’s also Medicare and Medicaid and the welfare system. (Welfare reform didn’t come close to reforming the whole system, just one of the six components of it.) The point is that we have passed the elective stage and have now entered the stage of imminent collapse. In that stage, monetary chaos and an uncertain fate for democracy await.

And what is Williamson’s reaction? When Americans protest, “I can be overdrawn; I still have checks,” Williamson nods, “Right you are.” But we’re not just overdrawn – we’re completely bankrupt.

Under these conditions, what are our choices? Suppose we remain in Obamaville. That will result in collapse. Suppose we go Williamson’s route, a route of picking and choosing a few pieces of low-hanging fruitful reform. That will also result in collapse.

We have nothing to lose and everything to gain by telling voters the truth and opting for revolutionary reform. If they reject us, we will be hung for offering a full-bodied sheep – limited government, free markets and freedom – rather than a bleating lamb of meekly pandering populism.

Popunomics

 

Williamson isn’t just selectively bad on economics – he has renounced economic logic entirely in favor of populist emotion. Take the minimum wage – Williamson’s shining example of popular Populism. The minimum wage is one of three or four most heavily researched measures in economics, having attracted empirical studies consistently since the late 1940s. Until the notorious Card-Krueger study in 1993, these found that the minimum wage adversely affected employment of low-skilled labor. These findings jibed with a priori theory, which predicted that a minimum wage would produce a surplus of labor (unemployment), increase the scope for discrimination by buyers of labor against sellers of labor, reduce the quality of labor and/or jobs, encourage businesses to offer fewer benefits and more part-time jobs and encourage businesses to substitute machinery and high-skilled labor for low-skilled labor. All these effects have been observed in conjunction with the minimum wage since its imposition. Card and Krueger offered no rebuttal to the eloquent testimony of the research record and were notably silent on the theory underpinning their own research result, which purported to find an increase in comparative employment in one state after an increase in the minimum wage. Both the validity of their data and the econometric soundness of their results were later challenged.

Having carefully chosen one of the most economically untenable of all Populist positions on which to “meet voters where they are,” Williamson next ups the ante. From the debased coin of the minimum wage, he turns to the fool’s gold of restrictionist anti-immigrationism. The late Richard Nadler painstakingly showed – and in NR to boot, in 2009’s “Great Immigration Shoot-Out” – that restrictionists were big and consistent electoral losers in Republican primaries and general elections. But Williamson is back at the same old stand, hawking “stronger border controls… mandatory use of E-verify… and like measures” because “voters are solidly on the conservatives’ side on this issue.”

Oh really? Just in time – net immigration has been roughly zero for the last few years. Market forces, not government quotas, control international migration; the quotas merely serve to criminalize violators. Immigration benefits America

on net balance, regardless of its legal dimension. Along with free trade and opposition to the minimum wage, place support of free international migration among the issues upon which economists strongly agree.

Wait a minute – Williamson has gone from supporting brain-dead economics because it is generally popular (the minimum wage) to supporting it because it is popular with NR’s constituency. Just as Buckley had to rescue the Right from the anti-Semitism of the American Mercury and the conspiratorial John Birch Society, we are now faced with the task of rehabilitating the right wing from the crank nativism and restrictionism that has asserted squatter’s rights at National Review. Calling Williamson’s version of expedience Populism gives ideology a bad name. The 19th-century Populism of Pitchfork Ben Tillman, et al, featured cheap money and fashionably bad economics but it was more consistent than Williamson’s proposal.

Borrowing the argot of the digital generation, Williamson is expounding not Populism but rather PLR – the “path of least resistance.” Put your finger to the wind and sense what we can get the voters to sign off on. See how many fundamental principles and how much government money we’ll have to sacrifice to win the next election. Williamson purports to be lecturing us on why Republicans fail – because they are too ideologically scrupulous, insisting on free markets, free trade, open borders, flexible prices, deregulation. But the encroachment of big government and the welfare state proceeded mostly unabated throughout the 20th century despite periods of Republican ascendancy. How could this have happened? Because Republicans were really heeding Williamson’s doctrine all along; PLR ruled, not ideological constancy. Goldwater never led the Republican Party, even when he won the nomination. Reagan was detested by the Party establishment and his philosophy was ditched the minute Air Force One lifted off the runway to return him to California. PLR was always the de facto rule of thumb – and forefinger, ring finger and all other digits. How else could a Party ostensibly supporting limited government have countenanced the transition to unlimited government?

Williamson treats the rise of the Tea Party as America’s version of China’s Cultural Revolution. Whew! We must cease all this senseless bloodletting and wild-eyed revolutionary fervor; return to our senses and settle for what we can get rather than striving for Utopia. Back to normalcy, back to pragmatism and compromise and half-a-loaf … well, maybe a quarter-loaf… or even a slice… hell, maybe even a few crumbs, just so its bread.

It is fitting that Keynesian economics has come home to roost in this time of Quantitative Easing and central-banking hegemony and liquidity everywhere with not a loan to drink. “In the long run, we are all dead” was Keynes’ most famous quip. Well, we can’t live in the short run forever. The procession of short runs eventually produces a long run. And the long run is here.

It’s time to pay up. The voters have given Republicans a gift – the chance to tell the truth and turn the ship around before we reach the falls. PLR is no longer sufficient. It’s time – no, it’s long past time to start doing all the things that Williamson says Republicans can’t do and mustn’t do.

The Anti-Economics Party of the Party of Sound Economics?

 

“The American public is in many ways conservative, but in many ways it is not, and its conservatism often is not the conservatism of Milton Friedman or Phil Gramm but that of somebody who fears the national debt and dreads bureaucracy but rather likes his Social Security check.” The Republican Party’s glory days of the post-World War II period came during the Great Moderation ushered in by the Reagan Presidency, beginning in late 1980 and continuing into the present millennium. This success and victory in the Cold War were the only departures from PLR. This period of prosperity was driven by an economic policy whose positive features were disinflation, sound money, low taxes and low inflation. This is a combination that Keynesian economics finds contradictory and now repudiates utterly. Williamson repudiates it, too, hence his explicit rejection of Milton Friedman and Phil Gramm as exponents of conservatism. (Once again, his use of Friedman, a libertarian rather than a conservative, is disingenuous.) He is still living in the past, the days when we could have our conservatism and our Social Security checks, too. Sorry, we have bigger problems now than how to buy votes from our own voter base to win the next election.

For years, Republicans have been able to win occasional elections the easy way, by adopting PLR. Those days are over. From now on, the Republicans will have to earn their money as a party of limited government by actually practicing the principles they profess. That is the bad news. But the good news is that they cannot lose by doing this. The very economics that Kevin Williamson looks down on tells us that.

Economics defines “cost” as the alternative foregone. If telling the truth will cause you to lose the election, you may well decide to lie; the cost of truth-telling will seem too high. But if winning the election and losing the election are reduced to equivalence by the consequences of economic collapse, then telling the truth suddenly becomes costly no longer. Now avoiding collapse becomes the only matter of consequence and the election outcome fades into insignificance.

Ironically, that is not only sound economics; it is also supremely pragmatic.

DRI-303 for week of 8-17-14: When Fighting Fire With Fire Just Makes a Bigger Blaze

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When Fighting Fire With Fire Just Makes a Bigger Blaze

Fans of the classic television series Get Smart will recall the snappy comeback of secret agent Maxwell Smart to a malefactor indignant at the prospect of detention: “You’re not going to arrest me on this flimsy evidence, are you?” “No,” Smart replied confidently, “I’ve got some more flimsy evidence.”

The quality of empirical debate over public policy has deteriorated to this level. Just as politicians are now compelled to act virtually any time something goes wrong, no matter what it is or how slim the likelihood of successful intervention, no exchange of opposing views is complete without quantitative citation. As soon as one side unveils its numbers, the other side must respond with numbers of its own – no matter how far-fetched or badly compiled. It is a Newtonian law of equal and opposite polemical reaction.

As a result, public discourse is now debased to the point of decadence. The long-running debate over the minimum wage has plumbed these depths of intellectual degradation. In the August 21 Wall Street Journal op-ed, “Do Higher Minimum Wages Create More Jobs?” authors Liya Palagashvili and Rachel Mace probe for the bottom. It is as if they have rewritten Mel Brooks’ script: “You don’t expect me to believe this flimsy evidence, do you?” “Well, my flimsy evidence is a lot better than your flimsy evidence!”

The Left Wing’s Flimsy Evidence

Op-ed authors Palagashvili and Mace (hereinafter, P&M) correctly relate that the left-wing Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR) released a report purporting to demonstrate the success of state-level minimum-wage increases in increasing relative employment growth among states. The report was released in June, 2014, and used data compiled by the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics. It examined 13 states that increased their individual minimum wage (as distinct from the federal minimum wage) that month and compared them to the other 37 states whose minimum wage did not rise. The report claimed that the average overall employment growth among the 13 states exceeded that of the 37 states for the five-month comparison period.

The Obama administration appropriated these conclusions with the alacrity of a police department confiscating drug-dealer assets. As P&M note, there was the little matter of “why [the] firms [would] hire more workers when the government raises the cost of hiring workers?” The straight-faced answer was that “hiking the minimum wage raises the incomes of poor workers, causing them to spend more. This additional spending, in turn, is so great that firms hire even more workers.” No less a personage than Barack Obama himself got into this act. “That [worker spending] gets churned back into the economy. And the whole economy does better, including the businesses.”

A priori, this “theory” of economic development is so ludicrous that it would qualify for an evening comedy skit at an American Economic Association convention. “Ludicrous” means ludicrous a priori; its theoretical underpinnings are so completely lacking that nobody would take it seriously enough to investigate. Well, nobody should – these days, no premise is too ridiculous if it can backstop a political point. Our Economist-in-Chief in the White House needs to bolster his standing with the public and shore up two key constituencies. One of those is obvious – the poor, downtrodden low-skilled workers who allegedly benefit from the minimum wage. The other is hidden – the higher-skilled workers, particularly union members, who substitute for the low-skilled workers laid off after the minimum-wage increase.

The “spending rescue” thesis is the culmination of two decades’ worth of left-wing attempts to promote the minimum wage as the salvation of the poor. This crusade began in the early 1990s, when economists David Card and Alan Krueger published a now-legendary study purporting to show that imposition of a minimum wage in New Jersey increased employment there relative to Pennsylvania. The defects of this study have since become almost as legendary as its conclusions. It utilized phone surveys to gather data – a technique heretofore shunned within the profession but thereupon praised as innovative and groundbreaking. But when other economists attempted to confirm the results using payroll data, this change instead reversed the results of Card and Krueger. The study’s econometrics has been panned by expert econometricians. Card and Krueger themselves were unable to supply a theoretical rationale for their result. Ordinarily, this would have been a fatal defect, but the policy implications of the study’s results were so delicious to the left wing that Card and Krueger were lionized and have gone on to professional fame and fortune. The only valid theory that would support their result does not comport with the reality of labor markets.

Why is the left so desperate to validate such a worthless policy measure? Their anxiety derives from the unique qualities of the minimum wage: it hides the benefits to their treasured constituency (unions), masquerades as a godsend to the poor while actually screwing them, and visibly appears to screw the rich (business owners, all of whom are assumed “rich” by definition) while actually doing so only in the short run. What a deal! The “optics” of the minimum wage are ideal for the left; that is, its visible or apparent effects are politically beneficial to them. Of course, its actual effects are harmful to everybody except the special-interest monopolists who comprise the left wing’s leading constituency these days, but that is jake with the left. Their ultimate goal is power – increasing real incomes for special interests are only a means to that end.

The Traditional Economic View of the Minimum Wage

Until Card and Krueger came along, the minimum wage vied with tariffs and quotas on foreign goods for the title of “most unpopular policy measure” among professional economists. Nearly a half-century of empirical examination reaffirmed the verdict of a priori theory: minimum wages redistribute jobs and real income from some poor and low-skilled workers to other poor and low-skilled workers by reducing employment, closing some businesses and temporarily reducing profits earned by businesses utilizing low-skilled labor.

These results are the outgrowth of the impact felt by business upon imposition of the minimum wage. Formally, it acts like a tax on the employment of low-skilled labor, which is the kind of labor directly affected by the minimum wage. That tax has three kinds of impact: a substitution effect, an output effect and a profit effect. (The first two of these are analogous to the substitution and income effect of a price change in consumer demand theory.) The substitution effect causes firms to employ less low-skilled labor and more of other inputs, including the higher-skilled labor previously mentioned as well as machinery that substitutes for labor. The output effect causes businesses employing low-skilled labor to produce less output, thereby employing fewer inputs of all kinds including labor. The profit effect reduces the profits earned by firms employing low-skilled labor. This third effect is only temporary, because the exit of some firms from the industry due to insolvency or better opportunities elsewhere will eventually raise the rate of return back to its previous, competitive level. That is why so-called rich business owners are adversely affected only transitorily by the minimum wage. The “permanent” gains go to workers who retain their jobs at the higher minimum wage. The “permanent” losses are suffered by workers who lose their jobs, some of whom may leave the labor force altogether. This phenomenon of exit from the labor force is by now well-known to most Americans; it has reached its highest level in over thirty years.

This is a formidable a priori case against the minimum wage. Economists never doubted that the minimum wage adversely affected employment of poor and low-skilled workers; they only doubted the degree to which this was true. Empirical studies of this issue began in the late 1940s, conducted by luminaries like future Nobel laureate George Stigler. Over the succeeding decades, economists used formal statistics to enforce the conditions necessary for a valid empirical examination of the issue.

One common defense of the minimum wage made by newspaper editorialists and readers over the years is that “the minimum wage went up but the U.S. unemployment rate did not go up; in fact, it went down, which proves that the minimum wage does not adversely affect employment.” This argument is invalid for several reasons. First, the minimum wage only affects employment within firms and industries that hire low-skilled labor. That does not begin to comprise the entire U.S. economy. Second, even within those industries directly affected by the minimum wage, the overall effects on employment of labor are equivocal. The substitution effect causes employment of less low-skilled labor but more higher-skilled labor, while the output and profit effects cause less employment of all inputs. It is not unusual at all to find that a liberal administration increases both the minimum wage and the money supply, with the latter causing temporary gains in income and employment that can swamp job losses associated with the minimum wage. This is not only ironic – since it harms the very people purportedly highest among the concerns of the left – but fully compatible with a condition in which the minimum wage causes job losses while the overall unemployment rate falls.

To avoid being fooled by effects outside the scope of the minimum wage, economists confined their studies to low-skilled workers and corrected their statistical methods to correct for trends and outside influences. That has been the traditional focus of econometrics, to compensate for the ways in which social sciences differ from the laboratory experiments common to the physical sciences.

Now, though, traditional econometrics has taken a back seat to raw political desire. And this corrupting influence has infected both sides of the political spectrum.

The Right Wing Retaliates With Its Own Flimsy Evidence

P&M disdain virtually all of the history and a priori theory cited above. They have their own flimsy evidence to present against the minimum wage. Their case is purely quantitative; clearly they believe in fighting fire with fire. They begin by finding the portion of the labor force comprised of low-skilled labor, which is roughly 2%, insufficient to generate the high-powered spending necessary to outweigh the minimum wage’s disincentives.

While no doubt true, this leaves room for counterargument by the left. Minimum-wage proponents will respond by accusing P&M of “overlooking” the greater propensity to spend by the poorest families. This is a feeble rebuttal, but the average person won’t know the difference and will probably rule the point a draw at best.

P&M then make a stronger point – that the logic of proponents’ case should mean that bigger minimum-wage boosts should have bigger effects on employment. In fact, the opposite was the case in January-May, 2014. The three substantial minimum-wage increases took place in Connecticut, New Jersey and New York, the three falling between 5% and 14%. Yet these three states had the worst job growth of the 13 increase-states, an average of 0.3% compared to the 1.28% average increase in the other 10 states. “Indeed, job growth was worse in each of these three states than it was, on average, in the 37 states that did not raise their minimum wage at all,” P&M report. And “in New Jersey, the state that hiked [the] minimum wage the most – to $8.25 an hour from $7.25 – employment actually fell by about 0.56%.” In the state with the largest job growth, WashingtonState’s 2.1%, the minimum wage went up by a whopping 13 cents per hour, or almost $24 per month for a full-time employee.

If P&M had rested content with this demonstration, they could have escaped criticism. Up to this point, they were merely using the left’s own evidence against it without accepting its methods. They were showing that the left’s argument wasn’t consistent even in its own terms, albeit without demonstrating how hopelessly confused those terms really were.

But P&M couldn’t stand prosperity. To a roll of drums, they unwrapped the crown jewel in their collection. “We conducted a statistical analysis of the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ data called a two-sample “t” test for comparing two means. We found, for this time period, no difference in the job-growth trend in the states that raised their minimum wages from states that did not. In other words, the correlation cited as debunking the economic case against the minimum wage is not statistically significant.”

Ta-daaaaaaa!!! Too bad there are no bows taken in print media; P&M would surely rate a round of applause in a run-of-the-mill graduate school economics seminar for their performance. It is surely no coincidence that “Ms. Mace studies economics at GeorgeMasonUniversity” while Ms. Palagashvili is a law-school fellow at NYU. Alas, they have displayed academia at its worst.

That is not to say that P&M flubbed their econometric dubs by conventional standards. We don’t know because we can’t see their results and have only their word as to their findings. But taking their comments at face value, it seems that they followed what have become standard econometric procedures. The t statistic is the standard one for small-sample tests of statistical significance. A comparison of sample means is a basic econometric procedure. Almost certainly, they assumed the standard “null hypothesis” of no difference between average job growth in the 13 states as compared to job growth in the 37 states. In this context, “no difference” does not mean that the two averages are exactly the same, which they obviously aren’t. It means that the degree of correspondence between the two is not sufficient as to enable us to be confident that the correspondence was not due to random chance. And just what does “confident” mean? The standard meaning for it is that we must be at least 90% certain. Lacking that degree of confidence, we enter a finding of “statistically insignificant” – which means that the minimum-wage increase did not “cause” the increases in job growth.

It is overwhelmingly likely that the readers of this op-ed – who undoubtedly make up a sample of Americans that is far more intelligent than any randomly chosen sample – fall into two categories: those who have no idea what P&M’s “statistical significance” paragraph meant and those who think they know but are wrong. Those who correctly understand it probably represent a statistically invisible sliver of its readership. And a majority of economists and statisticians are excluded from that sliver.

P&M thought that they were “one up” on the minimum-wage proponents at CEPR because they (P&M) were using the tool of statistical significance as it has been used for decades in academia and government. That statement would be correct only if the word “misusing” were substituted for “using” in two places. That is why they were fighting fire with fire – they were responding to CEPR’s misuse of numbers with their own misuse of statistical inference. Their mistakes were just fancier than CEPR’s, that’s all.

The Flaws of Statistical Significance

Various authors have expounded the flaws of statistical significance as developed by the late statistician Sir Ronald Fisher. The most comprehensive treatment is probably that of Deirdre McCloskey and Stephen Ziliak, The Cult of Statistical Significance: How the Standard Error Costs Us Jobs, Justice and Lives. For our purposes, it is sufficient to summarize how one of the two groups referred to above views the notion of statistical significance and compare it with the truth.

Ask readers of the Wall Street Journal op-ed to explain the meaning of P&M’s statistical significance paragraph in layman’s terms. Those who think they know the answer will probably say something like the following: “Well, it means that the effect of an increase in the minimum wage on overall job growth is insignificant, the opposite of significant. That means it is “too small to matter.” It’s so small we can’t be confident that something else might not be causing what we’re seeing in job growth.” That’s an intuitively appealing explication for at least two reasons. First, it incorporates the familiar meaning of the words “significant” and “insignificant.” Second, it incorporates the kind of answer we are looking for when we do empirical research on issues like this. Typically, we want “how big” or “how much” kinds of answers rather than “yes or no” types of answers.

Unfortunately, the concept of statistical significance is not what most people think it is. Its findings do not convey any quantitative sense of how big an effect is or how much influence one variable (such as an increase in the minimum wage) has on another (such as state-level growth in employment). Rather, it is a binary, “yes-no” type of concept. It registers the likelihood that the influence of one variable on another is random, as compared to systematic or non-random. Because the variables involved are invariably derived from sample data, it can be viewed as a verdict on the representativeness of a chosen sample.

This is useful information, to be sure. But it is not the most useful information we could wish to obtain. And that is a crying shame because the obsession with statistical significance has pretty much overshadowed everything else in empirical research in the social sciences and even in much of the physical sciences today. This has reached such epidemic proportions that McCloskey, a leading economic historian and econometrician, declares that most statistical work in economics done over the last thirty years is useless and must be done over. That is tantamount to saying that we might as well junk the leading academic journals published during that interval.

Fighting Fire With Fire

The proper reaction to P&M’s reaction to the CEPR study and the left-wing minimum-wage ballyhoo is a polite yawn and a “So what?” This should be followed by a trip to the woodshed and back to the drawing board for P&M, where they would be schooled in proper econometric practice. Alternatively, they can do what true free-market economists have done while their colleagues were practicing pretend-Science: spend the time honing their understanding of concepts like the time-structure of production and capital theory. That will better inform their grasp of reality than the most esoteric econometric model.

Fighting fire with fire can work in specialized cases like oil-well fires. But in today’s debates over economic theory and policy, fighting fire with fire does not extinguish the original fire. It does not even provide intellectual illumination. It merely makes the blaze bigger.

DRI-291 for week of 7-27-14: How to Debate Bill Moyers

An Access Advertising EconBrief:

How to Debate Bill Moyers

In the course of memorializing a fellow economist who died young, Milton Friedman observed that “we are all of us teachers.” He meant the word in more than the academic sense. Even those economists who live and work outside the academy are still required to inculcate economic fundamentals in their audience. The general public knows less about economics than a pig knows about Sunday – a metaphor justly borrowed from Harry Truman, whose opinion of economists was famously low.

Successful teachers quickly sense that they have entered their persuasive skills into a rhetorical contest with the students’ inborn resistance to learning. Economists face the added handicap that most people overrate their own understanding of the subject matter and are reluctant to jettison the emotional baggage that hinders their absorption of economic logic.

All this puts an economist behind the eight-ball as educator. But in public debate, economists usually find themselves frozen against the rail as well (to continue the analogy with pocket billiards). The most recent case of this competitive disadvantage was the appearance by Arthur C. Brooks, titular head of the conservative American Enterprise Institute (AEI), on the PBS interview program hosted by longtime network fixture Bill Moyers.

Brooks vs. Moyers: An Unequal Contest

At first blush, one might consider the pairing of Brooks, seasoned academic, Ph D. and author of ten books, with Moyers, onetime divinity student and ordained minister who left the ministry for life in politics and journalism, to be an unequal contest. And so it was. Brooks spent the program figuratively groping for a handhold on his opponent while Moyers railed against Brooks with abandon. It seemed clear that each had different objectives. Moyers was insistent on painting conservatives (directly) and Brooks (indirectly) as insensitive, unfeeling and uncaring, while Brooks seemed content that he understood the defensive counterarguments he made in his behalf, even if nobody else did.

Moyers never lost sight of the fact that he was performing to an audience whose emotional buttons he knew from memory and long experience. Brooks was speaking to a critic in his own head rather than playing to an alien house whose sympathies were presumptively hostile.

To watch with a rooting interest in Brooks’ side of the debate was to risk death from utter frustration. In this case, the only balm of Gilead lies in restaging Brooks’ reactions to Moyers’ sallies. This should amount to a debater’s handbook for economists in dealing with the populists of the hard political left wing.

Who is Bill Moyers?

It is important for any debater to know his opponent going into the debate. Moyers is careful to put up a front as an honest broker in ideas. Brooks’ appearance on Moyers’ show is headlined as “Arthur C. Brooks: The Conscience of a Compassionate Conservative,” as if to suggest that Moyers is giving equal time in good faith to an ideological opponent.

This is sham and pretense. Bill Moyers is a professional hack who has spent his whole life in the service of the political left wing. While in his teens, he became a political intern to Texas Senator Lyndon Johnson. After acquiring a B.A. degree in journalism from the University of Texas at Austin, Moyers got an M.A. from the Southwest Baptist Theological Seminary in Fort Worth, Texas. After ordination, he forsook the ministry for a career in journalism and left-wing politics, two careers that have proved largely indistinguishable for over the last few decades. He served in the Peace Corps from 1961-63 before joining the Johnson Administration, serving as LBJ’s Press Secretary from 1965-67. He performed various dirty tricks under Johnson’s direction, including spearheading an FBI investigation of Goldwater campaign aides to uncover usable dirt for the 1964 Presidential campaign. (Apparently, only one traffic violation and one illicit love affair were unearthed among the fifteen staffers.) A personal rift with Johnson led to his resignation in 1967. Moyers edited the Long Island publication Newsday for three years and he alternated between broadcast journalism (PBS, CBS, back to PBS) and documentary-film production thereafter until his elevation to the presidency of the SchumanCenter for Media and Democracy in 1990. Now 80 years old, he occupies a position best described as “political-hack emeritus.”

With this resume under his belt, Moyers cannot maintain any pretense as an honest broker in ideas, his many awards and honorary degrees notwithstanding. After all, the work of America’s leading investigative reporters, James Steele and Donald Barlett, has been exposed in this space as shockingly inept and politically tendentious. Journalists are little more than political advocates and Bill Moyers has thrived in this climate.

In the 1954 movie Night People, Army military intelligence officer Gregory Peck enlightens American politician Broderick Crawford about the true nature of the East German Communists who have kidnapped Crawford’s son. “These are cannibals…bloodthirsty cannibals who are trying to eat us up,” Peck insists. That describes Bill Moyers and his ilk, who are among those aptly characterized by F.A. Hayek as the “totalitarians in our midst.”

This is the light in which Arthur Brooks should have viewed his debate with Bill Moyers. Unfortunately, Brooks seemed stuck in defensive mode. His emphasis on “conscience” and “compassion” seemed designed to stress that he had a conscience – why leave the inference that this was in doubt? – and that he was a compassionate conservative – as opposed to what other kind, exactly? Thus, he began by giving hostages to the enemy before even sitting down to debate.

Brooks spent the interview crouched in this posture of defense, thereby guaranteeing that he would lose the debate even if he won the argument.

Moyers’ Talking Points – and What Brooks Should Have Said

Moyers’ overall position can be summarized in terms of what the great black Thomas Sowell has called “volitional economics.” The people Moyers disapproves of – that is, right-wingers and owners of corporations – have bad intentions and are, ipso facto, responsible for the ills and bad outcomes of the world.

Moyers: “Workers at Target, McDonald’s and Wal-Mart need food stamps to survive…Wal-Mart pays their workers so little that their average worker depends on $4,000 per year in government subsidies.”

Brooks: “Well, we could pay them a higher minimum wage – then they would be unemployed and be completely on the public dole…”

Moyers: “Because the owners of Wal Mart would not want to pay them that higher minimum wage [emphasis added].

 

WHAT BROOKS SHOULD HAVE SAID: “Wait a minute. Did you just say that the minimum wage causes higher unemployment because business owners don’t want to pay it? Is that right? [Don’t go on until he agrees.] So if the business owners just went ahead and paid all their low-skilled employees the higher minimum wage instead of laying off some of them, everything would be fine, right? That’s what your position is? [Make him agree.]

Well, then – WHY DON’T YOU DO IT? WHY DON’T YOU – BILL MOYERS – GO BUY A MCDONALD’S FRANCHISE AND PAY EVERY LOW-SKILLED EMPLOYEE CURRENTLY MAKING THE MINIMUM WAGE AND EVERY NEW HIRE THE HIGHER MINIMUM WAGE YOU ADVOCATE. SHOW US ALL HOW IT’S DONE. DON’T JUST CLAIM THAT I’M WRONG – PROVE IT FOR ALL THE WORLD TO SEE. THEN YOU CAN HAVE THE LAUGH ON ME AND ALL MY RIGHT-WING FRIENDS.

[When he finishes sputtering:] You aren’t going to do it, are you? You certainly can’t claim that Bill Moyers doesn’t have the money to buy a franchise and hire a manager to run it. And you certainly can’t claim that the left-wing millionaires and billionaires of the world don’t have the money -not with Tom Steyer spending a hundred million dollars advertising climate change. The minimum wage has been in force since the 1930s and the left-wing has been singing its praises for my whole life – but when push comes to shove the left-wing businessmen pay the same wages as the right-wing businessmen. Why? Because they don’t want to go broke, that’s why.

WHY IT IS IMPORTANT TO SAY THIS: The audience for Bill Moyers’ program consists mainly of people who agree with Bill Moyers; that is, of economic illiterates who do their reasoning with their gall bladders. It is useless to use formal economic logic on them because they are impervious to it. It is futile to cite studies on the minimum wage because the only studies they care about are the recent ones – dubious in the extreme – that claim to prove the minimum wage has only small adverse effects on employment.

The objective with these people is roughly the same as with Moyers himself: take them out of their comfort zone. There is no way they can fail to understand the idea of doing what Moyers himself advocates because it is what they themselves claim to want. All Brooks would be saying is: Put your money where your mouth is. This is the great all-purpose American rebuttal. And he would be challenging people known to have money, not the poor and downtrodden.

This is the most straightforward, concrete, down-to-earth argument. There is no way to counter it or reply to it. Instead of leaving Brooks at best even with Moyers in a “he-said, he-said” sort of swearing contest, it would have left him on top of the argument with his foot on Moyers’ throat, looking down. At most, Moyers could have limply responded with, “Well, I might just do that,” or some such evasion.

Moyers: “Just pay your workers more… [But] instead of paying a living wage… [owners] do stock buy-backs…”

Brooks: [ignores the opportunity].

WHAT BROOKS SHOULD HAVE SAID: “Did you just use the phrase ‘LIVING WAGE,’ Mr. Moyers? Would you please explain just exactly what a LIVING WAGE is? [From here on, the precise language will depend on the exact nature of his response, but the general rebuttal will follow the same pattern as below.] Is this LIVING WAGE a BIOLOGICAL LIVING WAGE? I mean, will workers DIE if they don’t receive it? But they don’t have it NOW, right? And they’re NOT dying, right? So the term as you use it HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH LIVING OR DYING, does it? It’s just a colorful term that you use because you hope it will persuade people to agree with you by getting them to feel sorry for workers, isn’t it?

There are over 170 countries in the world, Mr. Moyers. In almost all of those countries, low-skilled workers work for lower wages than they do here in the United States. Did you know that? In many countries, low-skilled workers earn the equivalent of less than $1,000 per year in U.S. dollars. In a few countries, they earn just a few hundred dollars worth of dollar-equivalent wages per year. PER YEAR, Mr. Moyers. For you to sit here and use the term “LIVING WAGE” for a wage THIRTY TO FIFTY TIMES HIGHER THAN THE WAGE THEY EARN IS POSITIVELY OBSCENE. Don’t you agree, MR. MOYERS? They don’t die either – BUT I BET THEY GET PRETTY HUNGRY SOMETIMES. What do you bet – MR. MOYERS?

WHY IT IS IMPORTANT TO SAY THIS: The phrase “living wage” has been a left-wing catch-phrase longer than most people today have been alive. Its use is “free” because users are never challenged to explain or defend it. It sounds good because it has a nice ring of urgency and necessity to it. But upon close examination it disintegrates like toilet tissue in a bowl. There is no such wage as a wage necessary to sustain life in the biological sense. For one thing, it would vary across a fairly wide range depending on various factors ranging from climate to gender to race to nutrition to prices to wealth to…well, the factors are numerous. It would also be a function of time. Occasionally, classical economists like David Ricardo and Karl Marx would broach the issue, but they never answered any of the basic questions; they just assumed them away in the time-honored manner of economists everywhere. For them, any concept of a living wage was pure theoretical or algebraic, not concrete or numerical. Today, for the left wing, the living wage is purely a polemical concept with zero concreteness. It is merely a club to beat the right wing with. It is without real-world significance or content.

Given this, it is madness to allow your debate opponent the use of this club. Take the club away from him and use it against him.

Bill Moyers: “Wal Mart, which earned $17 billion in profit last year…”

Arthur Brooks: [gives no sign of noticing or caring].

WHAT ARTHUR BROOKS SHOULD HAVE SAID: “You just said that Wal Mart earned $17 billion in profit last year. You did say that, didn’t you – I don’t want to be accused of misquoting you. Does that seem like a lot of money to you? [He will respond affirmatively.] Why? Is it a record of some kind? Did somebody tell you it was a lot of money? Or does it just sort of sound like a lot? I’m asking this because you seem to think that sum of money has a lot of significance, as though it were a crime, or a sin, or special in some way. You seem to think it justifies special notice on your part. You seem to think it justifies your demanding that Wal Mart pay higher wages to their workers than they’re doing now. And my question is: WHY? Unless my ears deceive me, you seem to be making these claims on the basis of the PURE SIZE of the amount. You think Wal Mart should “give” some of this money to its low-skilled workers – is that right? [He will agree enthusiastically.]

OK then. Here’s what I think: WHY DON’T YOU, MR. MOYERS? [He will pretend not to understand.] I MEAN EXACTLY WHAT I SAID. WHY DON’T YOU DO IT, MR. MOYERS, IF THAT’S WHAT YOU BELIEVE? [He will smile or laugh: “Because I’m not Wal Mart, that’s why.] BUT YOU ARE, MR. MOYERS. OR YOU CAN BE. ANYBODY CAN BE. FOR THAT MATTER, THOSE WAL-MART WORKERS WHOSE WELFARE YOU CLAIM TO CARE FOR SO MUCH CAN BE, TOO. ALL YOU HAVE TO DO IS BUY WAL-MART STOCK. IT TRADES PUBLICLY, YOU KNOW.

IF YOU THINK WAL- MART SHOULD GIVE ITS MONEY AWAY, THEN BUY WAL-MART STOCK, TAKE THE IVIDENDS YOU PAY YOU AND GIVE THE MONEY AWAY TO WHEREEVER YOU THINK IT SHOULD GO. AFTER ALL, ONCE YOU BUY WAL MART STOCK…NOW YOU’RE WAL-MART. YOU OWN THE COMPANY. AT LEAST, YOU OWN A FRACTION OF IT, JUST LIKE ALL THE OTHER OWNERS OF WAL-MART DO. YOU WANT WAL MART TO GIVE ITS PROFITS AWAY? OK, GIVE THEM AWAY YOURSELF. WHY SHOLD THE GOVERNMENT WASTE MILLIONS OF DOLLARS IN BUREAUCRATIC OVERHEAD IN ACCOMPLISHING SOMETHING THAT YOU CAN ACCOMPLISH CHEAP FOR THE COST OF A DISCOUNT BROKERAGE COMMISSION?

And you can deduct it from your income tax as a charitable contribution…MR. MOYERS.

As far as that’s concerned, as a matter of logic, if Wal-Mart’s workers really agree with you that Wal-Mart is scrooging away in profits the money that should go to them in wages, then the workers could do the same thing, couldn’t they? They could buy Wal-Mart’s stock and earn that share of the profit that you want the company to give them. It’s no good claiming they don’t have the money to do it because they’d not only be getting a share of these profits you say are so fabulous, they’d also be owning the company that you’re claiming is such a super profit machine that it’s got profits to burn – or give away. If what you say is really true, you should be screaming at Wal-Mart’s workers to buy shares instead of wasting time trying to get the government to take money away from Wal-Mart so some of it can trickle down to the workers.

Of course, that’s the catch. I don’t even know if YOU YOURSELF BELIEVE THE BALONEY YOU’VE BEEN SPREADING AROUND IN THIS INTERVIEW. I don’t think you even know the truth about all three of those companies that you claim are so flush with profits. To varying degrees, they’re actually in trouble, MR. MOYERS. It’s all in the financial press, MR MOYERS – which you apparently haven’t read and don’t care to read. McDonald’s has had to reinvent itself to recover its sales. Wal-Mart is floundering. Target has lost touch with its core customers. And the $17 billion that seems like so much profit to you doesn’t constitute such a great rate of return when you spread it over the hundreds of thousands of individual Wal Mart shareholders – as you’re about to find out when you take my advice to put your money where you great big mouth is – MR. MOYERS.

WHY IT IS IMPORTANT TO SAY THIS: The mainstream press has been minting headlines out of absolute corporate profits for decades. The most prominent victim of this has been the oil companies because they have been the biggest private companies in the world. Any competent economist knows that it is the rate of return that reveals true profitability, not the absolute size of profits. Incredibly, this fact has not permeated to the public consciousness despite the popularity of 401k retirement-investment accounts.

Buying Wal-Mart stock is just another way of implementing the “put your money where your mouth is” strategy discussed earlier. If Bill Moyers’ view of the company were correct – which it isn’t, of course – it would make much more sense than redistributing money via other forms of government coercion.

The Goal of Debate

If you play poker and nobody ever calls your bluff, it will pay you to bluff on the slightest excuse. In debate, you have to call your debate opponent’s bluffs; otherwise, you will be bluffed down to your underwear even when your opponent isn’t holding any cards. Arthur Brooks was just as conservative in his debating style as in his ideology – he refused to call even Moyers’ most ridiculous bluffs. This guaranteed that the best outcome he could hope for was a draw even if his performance was otherwise flawless. It wasn’t, so he came off poorly.

Of course, he was never going to “win” the debate in the sense of persuading hard-core leftists to convert to a right-wing position. His job was to leave them shaken and uncomfortable by denying Bill Moyers the ease and comfort of taking his usual polemical stances without fear of challenge or rebuttal. This would have delighted the few right-wingers tuned in and put the left on notice that they were going to be bloodied when they tried their customary tactics in the future. In order to accomplish this, it was necessary to do two things. First, take the battle to Bill Moyers on his own level by forcing him to take his own advice, figuratively speaking. Second, clearly indicate by your contemptuous manner that you do not respect him and are not treating him as an intellectual equal and an honest broker of ideas. People react not only to what you say but to how you say it. If you respect your opponent, they will sense it and accord him that same respect. If you despise him, this will come through – as it should in this case. That is just as important as the intellectual part of the debate.

In a life-and-death struggle with cannibals, not getting eaten alive can pass for victory.

DRI-265 for week of 2-23-14: False Confession Under Torture: The So-Called Re-Evaluation of the Minimum Wage

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False Confession Under Torture: The So-Called Re-Evaluation of the Minimum Wage

For many years, the public pictured an economist as a vacillator. That image dated back to President Harry Truman’s quoted wish for a “one-armed economist,” unable to hedge every utterance with “on the one hand…on the other hand.”

Surveys of economists belied this perception. The profession has remained predominantly left-wing in political orientation, but its support for the fundamental logic of markets has been strong. Economists have backed free international trade overwhelmingly. They have opposed rent control – which socialist economist Assar Lindbeck deemed the second-best way to destroy a city, ranking behind only bombing. And economists have denounced the minimum wage with only slightly less force.

Now, for the first time, this united front has begun to break up. Recently a gaggle of some 600 economists, including seven Nobel Laureates, has spoken up in favor of a 40% increase in the minimum wage. The minimum wage has always retained public support. But what could possibly account for this seeming about-face by the economics profession?

The CBO Study

This week, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) released a study that was hailed by both proponents and opponents of the minimum wage. The CBO study tried to estimate the effects of raising the current minimum of $7.25 per hour to $9 and $10.10, respectively. It provided an interval estimate of the job loss resulting from President Obama’s State of the Union suggestion of a $10.10 minimum wage. The interval stretched from roughly zero to one million. It took the midpoint of this interval – 500,000 jobs – as “the” estimate of job loss because… because…well, because 500,000 is halfway between zero and 1,000,000, that’s why. Averages seem to have a mystical attraction to statisticians as well as to the general public.

Economists looking for signs of orthodox economic logic in the CBO study could find them. “Some jobs for low-wage workers would probably be eliminated, the income of most workers who became jobless would fall substantially, and the share of low-wage workers who were employed would probably fall slightly.” The minimum wage is a poorly-targeted means of increasing the incomes of the poor because “many low-income workers are not members of low-income families.” And when an employer chooses which low-wage workers to retain and which to cut loose after a minimum-wage hike, he will likely retain the upper-class employee with good education and social skills and lay off the first-time entrant into the labor force who is poor in income, wealth and human capital. These are traditional sentiments.

On the other hand, the Obama administration’s hired gun at the Council of Economic Advisers (CEA), Chairman Jason Furman, looked inside the glass surrounding the minimum wage and found it half-full. He characterized the CBO’s job-loss conclusion as a “0.3% decrease in employment” that “could be essentially zero.” Furman cited the CBO estimate that 16.5 million workers would receive an increase in income as a result of the minimum-wage increase. Net benefits to those whose incomes currently fall below the so-called poverty line are estimated at $5 billion. The overall effect on real income – what economists would call the general equilibrium result of the change – is estimated to be a $2 billion increase in real income.

The petitioning economists, the CBO and the CEA clearly are all not viewing the minimum wage through the traditional textbook prism. What caused this new outlook?

The “New Learning” and the Old-Time Religion on the Minimum Wage

The impetus to this eye-opening change has ostensibly been new research. Bloomberg Businessweek devoted a lead article to the supposed re-evaluation of the minimum wage. Author Peter Coy declares that “the argument that a wage floor kills jobs has been weakened by careful research over the past 20 years.” Not surprisingly, Coy locates the watershed event as the Card-Krueger comparative study of fast-food restaurants in New Jersey and Pennsylvania in 1994. This study not only made names for its authors, it began the campaign to make the minimum wage respectable in academic economic circles.

“The Card-Krueger study touched off an econometric arms race as labor economists on opposite sides of the argument topped one another with increasingly sophisticated analyses,” Coy relates. “The net result has been to soften the economics profession’s traditional skepticism about minimum wages.” If true, this would be sign of softening brains, not skepticism. The arguments advanced by the re-evaluation of the minimum wage have been around for decades. Peter Coy is saying that, somehow, new studies done in the last 20 years have produced different results than those done for the previous fifty years, and those different results justify a turnabout by the economics profession.

That stance is, quite simply, hooey. Traditional economic opposition to the minimum wage was never based on empirical research. It was based on the economic logic of choice in markets, which argues unequivocally against the minimum wage. Setting a wage above the market-determined wage will create a surplus of low-skilled labor; e.g., unemployment. Thus, any gains accruing to the workers who retain their jobs will come at the expense of workers who lose their jobs. The public supports the minimum wage on the misapprehension that the gains come at the expense of employers. This is true only transitorily, during the period in which some firms go out of business, prices rise and workers are laid off. During this short-run transition period, the gains of still-employed workers come at the expense of business owners and laid-off workers. But once the adjustments occur, the business owners who survive the transition are once again earning a “normal” (competitive) rate of profit, as they were before the minimum wage went up. Now, and indefinitely going forward, the gains of still-employed workers come at the expense of laid-off workers and consumers who pay higher prices for the smaller supply of goods and services produced by low-skilled workers.

The still-employed workers are by no means all “poor,” despite the face that they earn the minimum wage. Some are teenagers in middle- or upper-class households, whose good educations and social skills preserved their jobs after the minimum-wage hike. Some are older workers whose superior discipline and work skills made them irreplaceable. The workers who rate to lose their jobs are the poorest and least able to cope – namely, first-time job holders and those with the fewest cognitive and social skills. The minimum wage transfers income from the poor to the non-poor. What a victory for social justice! That is why even the left-wing economists like Alan Blinder formerly pooh-poohed the minimum wage as a means of helping the poor. (While he was Chairman of the CEA under President Clinton, Blinder was embarrassed when the arguments against the minimum wage in his economics textbook were juxtaposed alongside the administration’s support of a minimum-wage increase.)

This does not complete the roster of the minimum wage’s defects. Government price-setting has mirror-image effects on both above-market prices and below-market prices. By creating a surplus of low-skilled labor, the minimum wage makes it costless for employers to discriminate against a class of workers they find objectionable – black, female, politically or theologically incorrect, etc. Black-market employment of illegal workers – immigrants or off-the-books employees – can now gain a foothold. Business owners are encouraged to substitute machines for workers and have done so throughout the history of the minimum wage. In cases such as elevator operators, this has caused whole categories of workers to vanish. This expanded range of drawbacks somehow never finds its way into popular discussions of the minimum wage, which are invariably confined to the effects on employment and income distribution.

“If there are negative effects on total employment, the most recent studies show, they appear to be small,” according to Bloomberg Businessweek.  The trouble is that the focus of the minimum wage is not properly on total employment. The minimum wage itself applies only to the market for low-skilled labor, comprising roughly 20 million Americans. There are certainly effects on other labor and product markets. But it is difficult enough to estimate the quantitative effect of the minimum wage on the one market directly affected, let alone to gauge the secondary impact on the other markets comprising the remaining 300 million people. The Obama administration, the vocal economists, the Bloomberg Businessweek and the political Left are ostensibly concerned with the poor. Why, then, do they insist on couching employment effects only in total terms?

It is clear that the same reasons why economists have traditionally chosen not to confuse the issue by dragging in total employment are also the reasons why economists now choose precisely to do so. They want to confuse the issue, to disguise the full magnitude of the adverse effects on low-skilled workers by hiding them inside the much smaller percentage effect on total employment. That is what allows CEA Chairman Jason Furman to brag that the “CBO’s central estimate…leads to a 0.3% decrease in employment… [that] could be essentially zero.” 500,000 is not 0.3% of 20 million (that would be 60,000) but rather 0.3% of the larger total work force of around 170 million. 0.3% sounds like such a small number. That’s almost zero, isn’t it? Surely that isn’t such a high price to pay for paying people what they’re worth – or what a bunch of economists think they’re worth, anyway.

But we digress. Just what is it that causes those “apparently small” effects on total employment, anyway? “Higher wages reduce turnover by reducing job satisfaction, so at any given moment there are fewer unfilled openings. Within reasonable ranges of a minimum wage, the churn-reducing effect seems to offset whatever staff reductions occur because of higher labor costs. Also, some businesses manage to pass along the costs to customers without harming sales.”

This is mostly warmed-over sociology, imported by economists for cosmetic purposes. American industry is pockmarked with industries plagued by high turnover, such as trucking. If higher wages were a panacea for this problem, it would have been solved long since. Today, we have a minimum wage. We also have a gigantic mismatch of unfilled jobs and discouraged workers. The shibboleth of businesses “passing along” costs to consumers with impunity was a cherished figment imagined in books by John Kenneth Galbraith in the 1950s and 60s, but neither Galbraith nor today’s economists can explain what hypnotic power businesses exert over consumers to accomplish this feat.

The magic word never mentioned by Peter Coy or the 600 economists or Jason Furman is productivity. Competitive markets enforce a strict link between market wages and productivity – specifically, between the wage and the discounted marginal value product of the marginal worker’s labor. Once that link is severed, the tether to economic logic has been cut and the discussion drifts along in never-never land. The political Left maunders on about the “dignity of human labor” and “a living wage” and “the worth of a human being” – nebulous concepts that have no objective meaning but allow the user to attach their own without fear of being proven wrong.

Bloomberg Businessweek‘s cover features a young baggage handler holding a sign identifying his job and duties, with a caption reading “How Much Is He Worth?” Inside the magazine, a page is taken up with workers posing for pictures showing their jobs and their own estimation of their “worth.” These emotive exercises may or may not sell magazines, but they prove and solve nothing. Asking a low-skilled worker to evaluate their own worth is like asking a cancer victim what caused their disease. Broadcast journalists do it all the time, but if that were really valuable, we would have cured cancer long ago. If a low-skilled worker were an expert on valuing labor, he or she would qualify as an entrepreneur – and would be set up to make some real money.

A Fine-Tuned Minimum Wage

Into the valley of brain death rode the 600 economists who supported a minimum wage of $10.10 per hour. Their ammunition consisted of fine-tuning based on econometrics. Let us hear from Paul Osterman, labor economist of MIT. “To jump from $7.25 to $15 would be a long haul. That would in my view be a shock to the system.” Mr. Osterman, exercising his finely-honed powers of insight denied to the rabble, is able to peer into the econometric mists and discern that $10.10 would be …somehow… just right – barely felt by 320 million people generating $16 trillion in goods and services, but $15 – no, that would shock the system. In other words, that first 40% increase would be hardly a tickle, but the subsequent 38% would be a bridge too far.

In any other context, it would be quite a surprise to the economics profession to discover that the study of econometrics had advanced this far. (The phrase “science of econometrics” was avoided advisedly.) For decades, graduate students in economics were taught a form of logical positivism originally outlined by John Neville Keynes (father of John Maynard Keynes) and developed by Milton Friedman. Economic theory was advanced by developing hypotheses couched in the form of conditional predictions. These were then tested in order to evaluate their worth. The tests ranged from simple observation to more complex tests of statistical inference. Hypotheses meeting the tests were retained; those failing to do so were discarded.

Simple and attractive though that may sound, this philosophy has failed utterly in practice. The tests have failed to convince anybody; it is axiomatic that no economic theory was ever accepted or rejected on the basis of econometric evidence. And the econometric tools themselves have been the subject of increasing skepticism by economists themselves as well as the outside world. One of the ablest and most respected practitioners, Edward Leamer, titled a famous 1983 article, “Let’s Take the Con Out of Econometrics.”

The time period pictured by Peter Coy as an “econometric arms race” employing “increasingly sophisticated” tools and models overlapped with a steadily growing scandal enveloping the practice of econometrics – or, more precisely, statistical practice across both the natural and social sciences. Within economics alone, it concerned the continuing failure of the leading economists and economic journals to correctly enforce the proper interpretation of the term “statistical significance.” This failure has placed the quantitative value of most of the econometric work done in the last 30 years in question.

The general public’s exposure to the term has encouraged it to regard a “statistically significant” variable or event as one that is quantitatively large or important. In fact, that might or might not be true; there is no necessary connection between statistical significance and quantitative importance. The statistician needs to take measures apart from ascertaining statistical significance in order to gauge quantitative importance, such as calculating a loss function. In practice, this has been honored more in the breach than the observance. Two leading economic historians, Deirdre McCloskey and Steven Ziliak, have conducted a two-decade crusade to reform the statistical practice of their fellow scientists. Their story is not unlike that of the legendary Dr. Simmelweis, who sacrificed his career in order to wipe out childbed fever among women by establishing doctors’ failure to wash their hands as the transmitter of the disease.

This scandal could not be more relevant to the current rehabilitation of the minimum wage. The entire basis for that rehabilitation is supposedly the new, improved econometric work done beginning in 1994 – the very time when the misuse and overemphasis of statistical significance was in full swing. The culprits included many of the leading economists in the profession – including Drs. Card and Krueger and their famous 1994 study, which was one of dozens of offending econometric studies identified by McCloskey and Ziliak. And the claim made by today’s minimum-wage proponents is that their superior command of econometrics allows them to gauge the quantitative effects of different minimum-wages so well that they can fine-tune the choice of a minimum wage, picking a minimum wage that will benefit the poor without causing much loss of jobs and real income. But judging the quantitative effect of dependent variables is exactly what econometrics has done badly from the 1980s to the present, owing to its preoccupation with statistical significance. The last thing in the world that the lay public should do is take the quantitative pretensions of these economists on faith.

This doesn’t sound like a profession possessing the tools and professional integrity necessary to fine-tune a minimum wage to maximize social justice – whatever that might mean. In fact, there is no reason to take recent pronouncements by economists on the minimum wage at face value. This is not professional judgment talking. It is political partisanship masquerading as analytical economics.

The Wall Street Journal pointed out that the $2 billion net gain in real income projected by the CBO if the minimum wage were to rise to $10.10 is a minute percentage gain compared to the size of a $16 trillion GDP. (It is slightly over 0.001%.) The notion of risking a job loss of one million for a gain of that size is quixotic. Even more to the point, the belief that economists can predict gains or losses of that tiny magnitude in a general equilibrium context using econometrics is absurd. The CEA and the CBO are allowing themselves to be used for political purposes and, in the process, allowing the discipline of economics to be prostituted.

The increasing politicization of economics is beginning to produce the same effects that subservience to political orthodoxy produced on Russian science under Stalin. The Russian scientist Lysenko became immortal not because of his scientific achievements but because of his willingness to distort science to comport with Communist doctrine. The late, great economist Ronald Coase once characterized the economics profession’s obsession with econometrics as a determination to “torture the data until it confesses.” Those confessions are now taking on the hue of Soviet-style confessions from the 1930s, exacted under torture from political dissidents who wouldn’t previously knuckle under to the regime. Today, politically partisan economists torture recalcitrant data on the minimum wage in order to extract results favorable to their cause.

The CBO and the CEA should have new stationery printed. Its logo should be an image of Lubyanka Prison in old Soviet Russia.

DRI-259 for week of 2-10-13: Coverage of President Obama’s SOTU Minimum-Wage Proposal

An Access Advertising EconBrief:

Coverage of President Obama’s SOTU Minimum-Wage Proposal

As advertised, President Barack Obama’s 2013 State of the Union (SOTU) address outlined the economic agenda for his second term in office. Among its planks was a proposal to raise the minimum wage to $9.00 an hour from its current $7.25. The reputation of economics as “the dismal science” is vindicated by the coverage of this proposal in the news media, which is indeed nothing short of dismal.

The Wall Street Journal‘s Coverage of Obama’s Minimum-Wage Proposal

The Wall Street Journal is the leading financial publication in America – indeed, in the world. On page four of its morning-after coverage of Obama’s SOTU message, the Journal provided a five-column box headlined “Bid on Minimum Wage Revives Issue That Has Divided Economists,” written by reporters Damian Palette and Jon Hilsenrath. The pair predicts that “President Obama’s proposal… is likely to rekindle debates over whether the measure helps or hurts low-income workers.” And the debates will be between “White House officials” who “say the move …is aimed at addressing poverty and helping low-income Americans” and “Republicans and business groups, which have traditionally said raising the minimum wage discourages companies from hiring low-skilled workers.”

The article rehearses the specifics of the President’s proposal, which raise the minimum wage in stages to $9.00 per hour by 2015, after which it would be indexed to the rate of inflation. It reminds readers that Mr. Obama originally proposed to raise the minimum to $9.50 by 2011. It reports confident projections by “Administration officials” that at least 15 million Americans would directly benefit from the increase by 2015, not counting those now earning above the minimum whose wages would be driven higher by the measure.

Three paragraphs in the middle of the piece gloss over the views of “economists and politicians [who] are divided over the issue.” These consist of two economists, one proponent and one opponent, and one central banker. David Neumark of the University of California Irvine unequivocally maintains that “the effects of the minimum wage are declines in employment for the very least skilled workers,” while “a lot of the benefits …leak out to families way above the poverty line.” Alan Krueger from PrincetonUniversity, currently Chairman of the President’s Council of Economic Advisors, “found positive effects” from the minimum wage on fast-food workers in New Jersey. The authors do not remark the apparent coincidence that Neumark and Krueger studied precisely the same group of workers in reaching their conclusions. Janet Yellen, Vice-Chairman of the Federal Reserve, was quoted as refusing to endorse the minimum-wage increase on grounds of its irrelevance to current conditions, while admitting its adverse effects would probably be small.

The authors close out by summarizing the political strategies of the White House and Republicans in proposing and opposing the measure. The authors toss in a few numbers of general economic significance – surging stock market, recent increase in hiring, persistently slow economic growth, nagging high unemployment, decline in median real income since 2000. They cite the most recent minimum-wage increase in 2009 and note that 19 states already have statewide minima in excess of the current federal minimum.

The reader will notice that the Journal‘s headline refers to a revival of a debate between economists. Yet the article only cites two economists and the debate consists of approximately five lines out of five columns of prose – just over 4% of the article’s 120 lines. A reader who isn’t already thoroughly familiar with the issue will learn virtually nothing at all about why the minimum wage is bad or – for that matter – why its proponents think it is good. The closest thing to analysis are cryptic references to “discourages companies from hiring,” “declines in employment” and – most mysterious of all – “benefits” that “leak out to families way above the poverty line.”

Between 90% and 95% of the article is devoted to politics. And that is utterly superficial. The world’s leading financial publication has devoted substantial space to a Presidential proposal of economic significance, yet its readers would never suspect that the subject is one of the most highly research, well-considered and settled in all of economics. The minimum wage has been a staple application in microeconomics textbooks for over a half-century. Along with policy measures like free international trade and rent control, the minimum wage has generated the most lopsided responses in opinion surveys taken of economists. In percentages ranging from 75% to 90%, economists have resoundingly affirmed their belief that minimum wages promote higher unemployment among low-skilled workers – among their many undesirable effects.

Yet today Wall Street Journal reporters imply that it’s a 50-50 proposition. Or rather, they imply that economists are evenly divided on the merits of the measure. The article mentions a revival of a debate without explaining the terms of the debate or its previous resolution. Indeed, even the arguments of the proponent economist – the Chairman of the CEA, no less! – go unmentioned.

Something more than mere journalistic incompetence is on display here. The WSJ reporters are showing contempt for the discipline of economics. The only significant thing about economists, they imply, is that they are “divided.” The economics itself is hardly worth our attention.

Economists have only themselves to blame for their low repute. But readers deserve a truthful and complete understanding of the minimum wage.

The Minimum Wage As Seen by Economics – and Economists

The minimum wage is a species of the economic genus known as the “minimum price.” Other species include agricultural price supports, imposed for the ostensible purpose of increasing the incomes of family farmers. The idea behind all minimum prices is to make the price of something higher than it would otherwise be. The alternative embodies in “otherwise” is to allow the price of human labor to find its own level in a free labor market. That level is the point at which the amount of labor workers wish to supply is equal to the amount that businesses want to hire. Economists call the wage that equalizes the quantity of labor supplied with the quantity demanded the equilibrium wage.

In practice, the minimum wage is always legislatively pegged at a higher level than the current equilibrium wage. Otherwise there would be no point to it. And in practice, the minimum wage applies only to low-skilled labor. This is because wages reflect the value of labor’s productivity and low-skilled labor is the least productive kind. What is the effect of a higher-than-equilibrium wage for low-skilled labor?

Holding the price of anything above its equilibrium level produces a surplus of that thing. A surplus of human labor is called “unemployment” in layman’s terms. Thus, a minimum wage produces unemployment where there would otherwise be no (persistent) unemployment.

If this sounds pretty categorical, cut-and-dried and matter-of-fact, that’s because it is. Supply and demand are economics. More precisely, they are what we today label “microeconomics.” Since there is no macroeconomic theory left standing that is worthy of the name, that leaves us with supply and demand and very little else.

The federal minimum wage was first introduced in the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938. It first began attracting attention from academic economists after World War II when George Stigler wrote a celebrated article outlining its basic effects in 1946. The first edition of Stigler’s legendary textbook on microeconomic price theory appeared in 1949. This may have been the debut of the minimum wage as a textbook application – a way of illustrating what happens when the principles of supply and demand are flouted by government.

Stigler may have been the first future Nobel Laureate to oppose the minimum wage, but he headed up what became a long procession with few absentees. Since then, it has been rare to find an intermediate (junior-senior level) micro textbook that didn’t feature an analysis of the minimum wage and the effects of the labor surplus it causes. This practice has crossed political lines. Liberal economists write textbooks, too, but they were pitiless in their view of the minimum wage – at least until recently, anyway. Alan Blinder, former CEA member under President Bill Clinton, was embarrassed by the revelation that his political support for a minimum wage conflicted with his textbook’s unsparing criticism of it.

The Effects of a Minimum Wage

The effects of a minimum wage are those of a minimum price generally, translated into the specific context of the market for low-skilled labor. The overarching effect, whose implications far exceed the obvious, is the surplus of labor created. The resulting unemployment, in and of itself, confounds the expectations of minimum-wage proponents. Their stated purpose is to increase the monetary incomes, hence real incomes, hence well-being of low-income workers. But you can only benefit from a higher wage if you have a job from which to earn that wage. The low-skilled workers whose jobs are lost because of the minimum wage are harmed by it, not helped. Moreover, they have nowhere to go except the unemployment line. Ordinarily, people who lose their job look for another job. But low-skilled workers are already scraping the bottom of the barrel – when that residue is suddenly denied them, they’re out of luck.

But what about the people who don’t lose their job? They benefit, don’t they? True enough, at least as a first approximation. The minimum wage should be viewed as transferring income from some low-skilled workers to other low-skilled workers. It is tempting to say it transfers income from some poor workers to other poor workers, but this is not always true. Sometimes it transfer income from poor people to rich people or, more precisely, to the offspring of rich people. That outcome will be explained below.

Wait a minute – what about employers? To hear the left wing talk, the problems of the poor are mostly the fault of greedy bosses who refuse to pay the poor what they’re worth. (The ever-popular formulation is that employers owe their workers a “living wage.”) At least the minimum wage sticks it to those greedy bastards, doesn’t it?

The answer is: Yes and no, but mostly no. In the short run, owners of businesses share the cost of the minimum wage with workers who are driven out of work. Business owners share that cost because higher wages mean higher costs, and higher costs will reduce revenues and profits and drive marginal businesses out of business. The reduced supply of goods will drive prices to consumers higher.

In the long run, though, the higher price gradually attained by the market in response to the higher costs will restore the business rate of return (i.e., profit) to its “normal” level. So, the remaining businesses in the market do not suffer long-run harm from the minimum wage. In the long run, the burden of the minimum wage is borne by consumers of the products produced using low-skilled labor and by low-skilled workers who remain out of work or whose prospects for work and productivity are permanently reduced by their sojourn into unemployment.

In other words, the minimum wage does not exact class revenge against evil, greedy businessmen. It harms poor, low-skilled workers and consumers – who are mostly ordinary people. Is it any wonder, then, that even liberal economists have traditionally refused to endorse the minimum wage as a means of transferring income to the poor?

Wait – There’s More. A LOT More

If John Paul Jones were an economist, he might interject at this point that we have not yet begun our analytical fight against popular misconceptions about the minimum wage. The artificial surplus created by the minimum wage has even more insidious implications.

In a competitive market, the tendency toward equality between quantity supplied and quantity demanded of the good or service being provided exerts a restraining influence on the actions of buyers and sellers. If you show up to rent an apartment or house and the landlord doesn’t like the color of your skin, he might decide to not to rent to you. But when there are exactly as many buyers as there are apartments and houses on the market, this will cost him money. The economic history of the world – and the history of discrimination in the American South and South Africa, among other places – very strongly confirms that competition and economic incentives are the best means of overcoming racial discrimination.

But when the market is in surplus, the picture changes dramatically. Now the landlord can afford to discriminate among would-be buyers by turning down one he doesn’t particularly like, because he knows that others are out there waiting for his unit.

The logic applies to buyers as well. Under competitive conditions, employers cannot afford to discriminate against workers for any reasons not related to productivity. They know only too well how hard it is to find good help when the market is tight. But when unemployment is high, an employer with a “taste for discrimination” can afford to indulge it. (It is idle to talk about whether that behavior is against the law or not. In practice, the case for discrimination cannot be proved; legal cases are won by imposing heavy costs on defendants until they give up and settle by admitting guilt whether true or not. And the cases are prosecuted in the first place for political or economic reasons, not to achieve justice for defendants.)

One of life’s supreme ironies is that the very people who cry the loudest for an end to racial discrimination and lament the injustice of our racist society are the same people who lobby in favor of the minimum wage. By creating a surplus of low-skilled labor and reducing the effective cost of discrimination to zero, the minimum wage surely makes it easy for employers to exercise whatever racist urges they might feel.

…And More

The minimum wage is anti-black in its effects not only because it promotes discrimination, but also because it places blacks at an objective disadvantage. One thing employers look for is experience. On average, blacks are younger than other ethnic groups and have less experience. Thus, they are less able to cope with the labor surplus created by the minimum wage.

Both minimum and maximum prices bring the issue of product quality to bear on the decisions of businesses. When businesses can’t raise prices due to maximum prices, or price controls, they try to reduce product quality instead. Similarly, when businesses suddenly face an increase in the minimum wage, they look to offset its effects by retaining only their highest-quality low-skilled workers. That is, they retain the best-dressed, most punctual, technologically adept workers rather than the shabbier, less reliable, socially and technically awkward workers. All too often, the workers let go are the ones who need the job the most – namely, low-income blacks picking up the necessary skills to succeed in the working world. Their places are taken by the sons and daughters of the well-to-do, whose cultural and economic advantages gave them an occupational leg up when they entered the labor market. This is what David Neumark meant by benefits leaking out to the well-to-do.

Black (illicit) markets are an inevitable by-product of minimum and maximum prices. In this case, the existence of a labor surplus means that there are people willing to work at a lower wage than the prevailing wage. By offering sub-standard working conditions and employment “off the books,” some employers can induce workers into work that they wouldn’t accept in a competitive labor market. This is still another ill effect of the minimum wage and another way in which low-skilled workers bear its brunt.

The late Milton Friedman was outraged by popular efforts to depict the minimum wage as the salvation of the poor and underprivileged. He called it the most anti-black law on the books.

The Card-Krueger Study

In 1993, two economists made a bid to overturn the decades-old economic consensus against the minimum wage. David Card and Alan Krueger conducted a phone survey of fast-food establishments in New Jersey and Pennsylvania. They chose these two adjoining states because New Jersey had raised its minimum wage prior to the study period, during which Pennsylvania’s law remained unchanged. Their study found that New Jersey’s employment of low-skilled labor increased by 13% relative to Pennsylvania’s. They ascribed this to the fact that the higher wage had certain desirable effects on the labor force.

Both the general public and the economics profession went gaga over this single result. Despite decades of studies and negative results by dozens of distinguished economists, this one study was said to have revolutionized thinking on the minimum wage. In reality, its effects were more political than economic.

An attempt to replicate the study by the National Bureau of Economic Research used payroll records from the businesses surveyed by Card and Krueger rather than relying on the phone surveys. Apparent anomalies had been found in both the New Jersey and Pennsylvania date using the phone surveys, so the payroll records were substituted as a check on the results. Sure enough, recalculation of the results using the payroll records reversed the results of the study – New Jersey employment was now found to have declined by about 4% relative to Pennsylvania’s.

Alan Krueger parlayed the popularity of his study into the Chairmanship of the President’s Council of Economic Advisors. David Card has recently written a book about the subject of the minimum wage. But there is little reason to accept the results of their original study at its face value.

The Political Purpose of the Minimum Wage

Economists have long known that the true purposes of the minimum wage are political rather than economic. Low-skilled labor is a substitute for unionized labor and higher-skilled labor. By making low-skilled labor less attractive to employers, the minimum wage makes union labor more attractive. That is why unions have supported a minimum wage since long before it was actually adopted, both in the U.S. and in places like South Africa.

Unions are one of the strongest and most numerous constituent groups of the Obama administration. That is why the President has now opted to advance this proposal to increase the minimum wage. Yet The Wall Street Journal‘s piece – which purported to describe the economics and politics of the measure – did not breathe a word of this.

Note: The first draft of this post erred by saying that the minimum wage was introduced in the Wagner Act of 1935, rather than the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938.